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The Pleasure Is In the Consumption

It has to start somewhere; it has to start sometime. What better place than here, what better time th
Eclectically Curious
The Pleasure Is In the Consumption
By Clay Lowe • Issue #25 • View online
It has to start somewhere; it has to start sometime. What better place than here, what better time than now? - Guerrilla Radio
And if you want to live longer here’s the secret: the barbell. Strength training, as you age, reduces your risk for death, according to a new study from Penn State College of Medicine.
So my penchant for pumping iron may pay off yet. Gotta love the pump.(180KG)
The greatest feeling you can get in a gym, or the most satisfying feeling you can get in the gym is… The Pump. Let’s say you train your biceps. Blood is rushing into your muscles and that’s what we call The Pump. You muscles get a really tight feeling, like your skin is going to explode any minute, and it’s really tight - it’s like somebody blowing air into it, into your muscle. It just blows up, and it feels really different. It feels fantastic.

There’s a big retraction happening in the media world, has been for a while, and the latest headlines floating around the blogosphere are just a sign of the things to come.
One of the reasons I’ve moved more towards curation than creation (although folks like Colin Wright would tell you curation is creation) is because there’s jus sooo much content out there. The information overload syndrome is real. No doubt I’m stating the obvious, but I’m knee deep in reading Michael Bhaskar’s book, Curation: The power of selection in a world of excess and it’s making me really re-think my contribution to the noise.
I have to admit though, that information overload is a kind of bliss for me. I can disappear down the rabbit hole for days.
As I’m fond of saying, I love seeking knowledge for knowledge’s sake. I don’t even need to do anything with the knowledge.
The pleasure is in the consumption. 
Clay

Today's Learning
A world governed by surveillance, robotics, and virtual reality, could easily describe our present day situation. However, I lifted that from Ray Bradbury’s classic 1953 novel, Fahrenheit 451.
Watching this little explainer video gave me chills. While we haven’t quite got to the ‘burn all the books stage’ things do feel a little politically oppressed on both sides of the Pond.
Why should you read “Fahrenheit 451”? - Iseult Gillespie
Why should you read “Fahrenheit 451”? - Iseult Gillespie
Yuval Noah Harari: Why We Dominate the Earth
When Negativity Don’t Pull You Through: Asides 3
How to Want What You’ve Got in a World of Infinite Choice
Our perpetual contemporary: the digressive, prescient brilliance of DH Lawrence’s essays
Letters of Note: There is no danger down here
On that note, it’s Friday. I can smell the pizza in the oven and I’m sure the fridge is stocked with cold beer. Enjoy your Weekend!
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